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CATs voice mail:
291-2322

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SPCA
Office: 236-7333
Emergency: 737-1108


Endsmeet Animal Hospital
168 Middle Road, Devonshire
Phone 236-3292
Emergency: 694-0703
Hours of Operation
Monday to Friday 8am to 6pm
Saturday 8am to 12:30pm

Ettrick Animal Hospital
75 Middle Road, Warwick
Phone 236-0007
Emergency 236-0007 press 1
Hours of Operation
Monday to Saturday 8am to 6pm

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Questions & Answers

What age should I spay/neutering my cat?

The best time to alter your pet is before the animal reaches puberty. Many experts feel that six months of age is an ideal time to spay or neuter. However, there have been numerous studies done that show that healthy kittens spayed or neutered as young as six weeks of age do quite well. The recovery of such young kittens is very quick, and to date, no negative significant concerns have been found. Spaying and neutering kittens and puppies that are healthy at a very young age is becoming a growing trend that has been endorsed by major humane organizations including the Humane Society of the United States, the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Humane Association, and the Cat Fanciers' Association.

Some people still feel that a kitten should be larger and stronger before undergoing the general anesthesia required to perform the surgery, and to allow more time for the urinary tract system to develop. Consult with your veterinarian and other veterinary health professionals that you trust to help you determine the right age for your kitten or cat. And, speaking of cats, unless your cat has a health problem, spaying/neutering is considered safe at ANY age!! Most of the time, the owners of mature cats -- as well as the cats themselves -- enjoy all the benefits of the spay/neuter surgeries also!!

What are the benefits (other than controlling population) is there from spay/neutering my cat?

There are many benefits to having your pet spayed or neutered. For females, having them spayed will prevent them from going through any more heat cycles. Un-spayed females normally come into heat several times a year, and these cycles can last from several days to several weeks, and include such behaviors as spraying of urine (yes, females can spray, too!!), marking with urine, howling, and some other obnoxious behaviors. Neutering a male before he reaches puberty almost always prevents completely the development of all mating behavior, which includes spraying urine and marking territory with urine, and the desire to roam outside searching for a mate. This in itself puts the cat at great risk for injury or even death from being hit by cars; being the object of human cruelty; infection and disease from other cats; death from natural predators, and cat fighting.

How can I Deter Stray Cats

If you have a stray cat (or many stray cats) in your area, and would like to deter them from coming into your yard, here are a few things that you can do:

How do I deter cats from digging in my garden?